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why_should_we_start_without_doing_a_complete_analysis [2016/07/03 13:38]
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why_should_we_start_without_doing_a_complete_analysis [2017/08/10 13:35] (current)
Hans Samios [Just Start]
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-Take a look at the diagram. This is the same diagram in as before for a fictitious project. On it we see the the value delivered by an agile project doing highest value first. Compare this with a project where we do up front analysis before we start working any value delivery. How much time do you spend on detailed requirements?​ Industry statistics indicate that this could be anywhere from 30-50% of the total project time. What about financial analysis and all the details required to get through a "start project"​ phase gate? How much does that add the total project time? +Take a look at the diagram. This is the same diagram in as  ​[[how_does_the_agile_approach_allow_us_to_deliver_early|before]] for a fictitious project. On it we see the the value delivered by an agile project doing highest value first. Compare this with a project where we do up front analysis before we start working any value delivery. How much time do you spend on detailed requirements?​ Industry statistics indicate that this could be anywhere from 30-50% of the total project time. What about financial analysis and all the details required to get through a "start project"​ phase gate? How much does that add the total project time? 
  
 It doesn'​t really matter. No matter how you look at it in the time an agile project could be delivering a large percentage (40%? 50%? 60%) of the expected value for the project, the traditional approach has still only completed analysis, leaving all the risk remaining in the project. And remember, not only do we have no value delivered, but the additional analysis has also increased the risk associated with our plan. It doesn'​t really matter. No matter how you look at it in the time an agile project could be delivering a large percentage (40%? 50%? 60%) of the expected value for the project, the traditional approach has still only completed analysis, leaving all the risk remaining in the project. And remember, not only do we have no value delivered, but the additional analysis has also increased the risk associated with our plan.
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